Hudson River Valley Wineries

This blog is dedicated to news, events, profiles and reviews of fine food and wine in the Hudson River Valley. We especially feature and spotlight the burgeoning wineries of the Hudson River Region. We accept and will relay information about releases, events, festivals and any toher happening related to food and wine in the Hudson River Valley. Send pertitnent information to hudsonriverwine@yahoo.com

My Photo
Name:

Carlo DeVito is a long time wine lover, and author of books and magazine articles. He is the author of Wineries of the East Coast. He has traveled to wine regions in California, Canada, up and down the east coast, France, Spain and Chile. He has been a published executive for more than 20 years. He shepherded the wine book program of Wine Spectator as well as worked with Kevin Zraly, Oz Clarke, Matt Kramer, Tom Stevenson, Evan Dawson, Greg Moore, Howard Goldberg, and many other wine writers. He has also published Salvatore Calabrese, Jim Meehan, Clay Risen, and Paul Knorr. Mr. DeVito is the inventor of the mini-kit which has sold more than 100,000,000 copies world wide. He has also publisher such writers as Stephen Hawking, E. O Wilson, Philip Caputo, Gilbert King, James McPherson, John and Mary Gribbin, Thomas Hoving, David Margolick, Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr., John Edgar Wideman, Stanley Crouch, Dan Rather, Dee Brown, Susie Bright, and Eleanor Clift. He is also the owner of Hudson-Chatham Winery, co-founder of the Hudson Berkshire Beverage Trail, and president of the Hudson Valley Wine Country. https://carlodevito.wordpress.com/

Sunday, November 30, 2008

Locapour is Our New Word for 2009

Locapour is a word describing someone who drinks wine from a local radius, whatever that self-imposed restriction is, in order to support local farming and economy. The word is based on the word locavore.

A locavore is someone who eats food grown or produced locally or within a certain radius such as 50, 100, or 150 miles. The locavore movement encourages consumers to buy from farmers’ markets or even to produce their own food, with the argument that fresh, local products are more nutritious and taste better. Locally grown food is an environmentally friendly means of obtaining food, since supermarkets that import their food use more fossil fuels and non-renewable resources.

"Locavore" was coined by Jessica Prentice from the San Francisco Bay Area on the occasion of World Environment Day 2005 to describe and promote the practice of eating a diet consisting of food harvested from within an area most commonly bound by a 100 mile radius. "Localvore" is sometimes also used.

The New Oxford American Dictionary chose locavore, a person who seeks out locally produced food, as its word of the year 2007.[6] The local foods movement is gaining momentum as people discover that the best-tasting and most sustainable choices are foods that are fresh, seasonal, and grown close to home. Some locavores draw inspiration from the The 100-Mile Diet or from advocates of local eating like Barbara Kingsolver whose book Animal, Vegetable, Miracle chronicles her family's attempts to eat locally. Others just follow their taste buds to farmers' markets, community supported agriculture programs, and community gardens.

"[The] Locapour trend seems to be accelerating despite the country’s economic woes and dismal outlook, according to a recent report from The Nielsen Company which tracks alcohol beverage sales nationally," saysJim Tresize of the New York Wine and Grape Foundation. "There are several reasons for optimism: Despite the troubling economy, U.S. consumers are generally reluctant to cut back on beer, spirits, and especially wine, making it somewhat recession-resistant compared with other products. American wines have become more price-competitive because of recent changes in currency exchange rates, forcing importers to raise their prices. In tough economic times, Americans are psychologically more inclined to support local and U.S. products, and domestic wines are now growing more rapidly than imports. Wines from outside of California have also been gaining market share, reflecting the locapour trend. Unless the economy really tanks in the next few weeks, it is likely that consumers will consider wine an affordable indulgence for the holidays."

No matter the economic disaster ahead of us, and it seems we get bombarded with our own impending doom daily, locapour is my new word for the year 2009

POUR LOCAL!

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

Subscribe to Post Comments [Atom]

<< Home